Weigh in Wednesday – Week 2

Success! Total weight this morning? 296 lbs. That is 5 lbs lost in a week!


(I apologize for the bad pictures. I left my phone, i.e camera, at work last night. I could only take them in the mens room here at the office! Will try to replace!)

It has been a couple years since I have been down in the Two hundreds. I know I have a lot to go, but it is still progress!

Counting calories and exercising regularly has done wonders. I have been a Nutritional Label freak this past week, and it has paid off. But the most eye opening thing was the total calories I would consume without even thinking about it! Snacking here, bad meal there, bad meal here. It is truly amazing I am still alive just by looking at the junk I have been putting into my body. Here are some common foods consumed with a surprisingly high caloric value:

  • 2 Table Spoons of Peanut Butter – 200 Calories
  • 1 Large Bagel (123g) – 354 Calories
  • 1 Mini Bag Nacho Cheese Doritos (49.6) – 250 Calories
  • 8 0z Mountain Dew – 110 Calories (imagine how many calories are in a 20oz bottle)

Now this doesn’t mean swear off these foods! Well, the Mountain Dew can go. I would rather eat my calories than drink them. But the thing is, this past weekend.. Pizza. Yep, I ate pizza. But I had the nutritional information from the restaurant (Jet’s Pizza … a very awesome pizza place if you are in the Knoxville area) and one square of deep dish pepperoni pizza was 300 calories. Is that high? Yes. But moderation is key! I took ownership of that, and had 2 pieces on Sat and 2 pieces on Sunday. I built that into my daily caloric limit. My point is, I am not on a diet. I am simply changing the way I eat. I still eat what I want to eat, when I want to eat it. I simply choose healthier options and if I do eat unhealthy foods, I account for it in my diet and enjoy it in moderation!

The point is, you need to be AWARE of what you eat and account for it. Make a conscience decision about the things you put into your body. At the end of the day, you are ultimately responsible for you. No one made you eat that entire bag of chocolate sweet sixteen donuts (which btw, is a whopping total of 1226 calories at 230 calories per 3 donuts). Which yes, I have sadly done before. Sadly.

Couch to 5K

Every time I ask someone I know that is an avid runner what they would recommend to get started running, I keep hearing Couch to 5K.  The name of the program is quite self explanatory… it takes you from your couch (i.e, potato) to running a 5K (i.e, not a potato). Since I am looking at running not only as a minimum standard for minimum entrance into the United States Navy, but as an answer to a healthier lifestyle… this is going to be one of my tools in my arsenal to get me there.

The Couch to 5K is a simply program that can be found at CoolRunning.com. It is a 9 week program that progressively increases your running time week by week. It is a slow buildup, that takes you from a more-walking-less-jogging work out to a more-jogging-less-walking workout. The program is as followed:

Couch to 5K

Week Workout 1 Workout 2 Workout 3
1 Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes.
2 Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes.
3 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then do two repetitions of the following: 

  • Jog 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards (or three minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then do two repetitions of the following: 

  • Jog 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards (or three minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then do two repetitions of the following: 

  • Jog 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards (or three minutes)
4 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then: 

  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then: 

  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then: 

  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
5 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then: 

  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then: 

  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
  • Walk 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog two miles (or 20 minutes) with no walking.
6 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then: 

  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then: 

  • Jog 1 mile (or 10 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1 mile (or 10 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2-1/4 miles (or 25 minutes) with no walking.
7 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes). Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes). Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes).
8 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes). Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes). Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes).
9 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes). Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes). The final workout! Congratulations! Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes).

We will see how well this works out for me, I am pretty confident! I will be doing this Tues-Wed-Thurs. And then do a timed 1.5mile for my IFA every Saturday. Sun,Mon, and Fri are off days 🙂 So yes… I will be starting today!

Don’t forget, tomorrow is Weigh-In Wednesday!

Navy IFA #1

I figured since I am measuring myself on a weekly basis for weight loss, I must try to meet another standard.

Before each navy recruit is allowed to ship off to boot camp in the Great Lakes, he/she must pass what is called the Navy IFA, or the Navy Initial Fitness Assessment. What this does it ensure that each recruit is able to meet a certain level of fitness before shipping off to boot camp to increase the success rates of new recruits. If you are not able to pass the IFA prior to leaving for boot camp, you will not go.

Now, there are two brackets I could fall under, depending on how my progression lasts. There are standards for the 20-24 year old bracket, and the 25-29 year old bracket. I will strive for the first one, since it is a little bit harder and optimistically, I would atleast like to be in DEP while I am 24.

There are three components to the Navy IFA. There is a timed 1.5 mile run, which may be completed by running/walking. You must do as many pushups as possible in 2 minutes and may only rest in the “up” position, and as many situps as possible in 2 minutes with rest.
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Navy IFA Minimum Standards

Male Age 20-24
1.5 Mile Run 13:30
Push-ups 37
Sit-ups 46

And my results are as followed:

Navy IFA #1 12/04/10 My Results Minimum Standards
1.5 Mile Run 23:25 13:30
Push-ups 18 37
Sit-ups 21 46

Obviously I have some work to do. But I am not dissuaded at all. I had actually started doing some jogging about a month ago, and have noted improvement. When I first started I could barely jog 100 yds before I had to slow down. When I ran this IFA on Saturday, I was able to jog 1/2 mile without stopping. That is pretty good progress I would say!

I plan on doing this fitness assessment every Saturday, so stay tuned for results!

Staying Motivated

As with all new projects, most people feel highly motivated at the beginning. I am feeling this now as well. However, I am not naive. There will be times when it gets hard or I am tempted. I will try to convince myself that I can’t do it. But there are certain things I look to so I can try to stay motivated. Here are a few motivating things I turn to:

  • Future Sailor Weightloss This is the story of a guy who was overweight and wished to enlist in the Navy as well. He was 256 when he started. I believe now according to his twitter account (@Geoffbreedwell), he is currently serving and is stationed in CT. Very inspiration to know there are others like me.
  • Fat to Fit This is an amazing thread on a forum I like to visit. It is right now, a 239 page long thread of amazing men and women who have lost 10,20,50,75,100, and even 300+ lbs of weight. They have posted progress pics, etc. It is extremely motivating!
  • The Navy Cafe This site has some great members that post actively on the forums. Members include Active Duty and retired sailors alike. Very beneficial and motivating to hear of other’s stories.
  • 344pounds.com This blog is of a guy who has lost a tremendous amount of weight and has changed his life considerably. Very awesome and inspiring!
  • ExNavyNuke This is another blog that is a compilation of ex Navy Nuke’s experiences. Always motivating to read through these and strive for excellence.

Of course the biggest motivation comes from within. I am not only doing this to serve my country, but to serve myself. I am getting healthier to enjoy a long and rewarding life. And that by itself, is the most motivating factor in my pursuit of this goal.

1200 Calories

After doing quite a bit of research, I have decided to limit my intake of calories to 1200-1500 per day.

Utilizing online calculators, I have found my estimated BMR is 2642. That is my Basal Metabolic Rate which is roughly the amount of calories you’d burn if you stayed in bed all day and rested.

By utilizing a very commonly found chart, I would multiply that number by 1.2 due to my desk job/sedentary life style. That gives me a total of 3170 calories I need to take in to maintain my current weight. Maintaining is obviously NOT what I want, but it is eye opening to the lack of activity and garbage I called food I would eat.

As we all know, there are roughly 3500 calories in one pound of fat. To generate one pound of fat loss in a week, I need to come up with a 3500 caloric defecit throughout the week. I am not content with 1 lb a week.  I am aiming for 3-4 lbs per week. Which means I need to create a 14,000 caloric defecit throughout the week. So I must take in roughly.. 1200 calories.

What people do not understand is that this does NOT mean I only eat 1200 calories a day. It has been done and I am sure there will be days I do this, but that is not what it means. This means that through diet and exercise I need to create that defecit. So if I eat 2000 calories a day, I need to do 800 calories worth of exercise. I also ensure I take a daily multivitamin to get some of the nutrients/vitamins that may lack in my diet.

And how many calories do you burn doing an active? I recommend Health Status. Simply enter your weight and the number of minutes on each activity. It will tell you how many calories you have burned. I have found it to be reasonably accurate.

So how long will it take me to reach my shipweight? I need to lose 120 lbs of fat from my body. An entire person.That means I will need to create a 420,000 caloric defecit to achieve that goal. If I am aiming for a 14,000 caloric deficit a week, that means it will take me exactly 30 weeks to drop that weight. Roughly 7 1/2 months. Could take longer, could take shorter. It isn’t important. What is important, is that I do what I can to reach my goal.

The thing to remember is, I didn’t get this way over night and it won’t change over night. If I mess up a few days, just remember… this is not a diet. It is a lifestyle change. I am not restricting myself to certain types of foods etc. Simply making a conscience decision about every morsel I put into my body. If I want to eat a 500 calorie burger, I do. But I also recognize that is 500 calories I need to make up somewhere else via exercise. Therefore, I usually choose to not eat the burger!

Weigh In Wednesday – Week #1

Today marks a day for many different events.

The first one, being it is Wednesday, which will be my Weigh In Day. I plan to use every Wednesday’s weight as my progress marker. And our grand starting weight? 301. This means to make my shipweight I will need to lose exactly 121 lbs to meet the height/weight standards for the Navy at my height, 5″8. This seems like such an impossible goal, but I am committed to doing this.

Today, I also plan to sign the new lease with my girlfriend for the apartment. This will obligate us to this apartment until Oct of 2011. I am not too worried about this, she is very self sufficient and she fully supports my desire to enlist in the Navy. If for whatever reason I am able to leave before then, not holding my breath, she will be able to hold down the fort until then.